Nicolas Cage Once Won $20,000 Gambling & Donated It All

Cage Coin: I made some custom printed poker chips for a Nicolas Cage Casino themed party.

Cage Coin: I made some custom printed poker chips for a Nicolas Cage Casino themed party. submitted by GunFuCleric to onetruegod [link] [comments]

5th annual Nicolas Cage themed casino party!

5th annual Nicolas Cage themed casino party! submitted by GunFuCleric to onetruegod [link] [comments]

1990's Caught Nicolas Cage walking through Vegas casino

1990's Caught Nicolas Cage walking through Vegas casino submitted by oldvegasdude to OldSchoolCool [link] [comments]

[US] Snake Eyes (1998): A wild police detective finds himself in the middle of a murder conspiracy set during a boxing match inside an Atlantic City casino. Directed by Brian De Palma, starring Gary Sinise, Carla Gugino and the one true god, Nicolas Cage.

submitted by bydemons to NetflixBestOf [link] [comments]

Nicolas Cage at Red Rock Casino

Nicolas Cage at Red Rock Casino submitted by Blindside785 to onetruegod [link] [comments]

Our Lord and Savior

Our Lord and Savior submitted by maaat21 to memes [link] [comments]

My Top 10 Most Anticipated movies of 2021

With the year coming to a close, & not really that many more movies to be hyped for or be on the look out for, except for maybe a few smaller budget films, as well as both Soul and Wonder Woman 1984 (if you were lucky to not have to wait till Christmas for WW84 to come out, then please reframe from spoilers), I think it's about time I get into my top 10 most Anticipated movies of 2021, now before I begin I should mention I have no idea if any of these will come out as they are originally intended, so if any plans get changed and this ends up becoming outdated....well life sucks first of all and secondly this is probably an older post. Secondly I do not know about any smaller budget indie films or independent movies coming out, so if you ask why a certain Indie film is not on my list then I probably don't know that they even exist.
Finally this list is strictly my own personal opinion, so if my list isn't in an order you like, or if there is a certain film that should be in my list that isn't...well then that's probably why. Also I'd be interested to read your list.
Anyways, with that out of the way, let's begin:
  1. A tie between Dune and The Matrix 4 - Yep, out of all the films coming out in 2021, there are no two other films I am excited to see more then the Matrix 4 and Dune (which is why they are both tied as my number 1) I'll start with the Matrix 4. I absolutely loved the first film, I thought the second movie was an alright Guilty Pleasure that had it's moments to shine, & the third one...well....the less said about the third one, the better. But I have faith that the Wachowskis can learn from there mistakes and make an incredibly awesome proper finale to the series, if this is what it will be, & I believe it will be an excellent movie. With Keanu Reeves and Trinity herself apparently returning, & Hugo Weaving's Daughter (who I loved in Bill & Ted 3) being in the movie as well. On top of that from the looks of things, it may be returning to what made the first Matrix movie great. So yeah, pretty hyped. As for Dune, I'll admit I've never actually read the original book, nor have I ever watched the last attempt at trying to make Dune into a movie, but from the trailer alone, it looks pretty solid. Denis Villeneuve's direction looks absolutely breath taking, & the worlds and universe seen in the trailer looks very incredible as well. Not to mention very unique. It actually looks more like something out of Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones then it does something like Star Trek or Star Wars. Not to mention the film looks to have a stellar cast. Either way I am pretty hyped for this movie, after Blade Runner 2049, I have faith that Villeneuve will make an excellent Sci-Fi film.
  2. Last Night In Soho - I'm not even a fan of horror movies, & yet I am still hyped for this movie. Why? Because Edger Wright is directing it. That should probably tell you how much I love Edger Wright as a director. I absolutely loved the Cornetto Trilogy (especially Hot Fuzz, which is probably one of my favorite comedies of all time) and Baby Driver, & I think this film looks incredible. Not to much it has a stellar cast, and the premise sounds very interesting and could make for an amazing psychological horror film on the same level as something like Get Out or Midsommar (yes I know I said I didn't like horror movies but...well...let's just say my GF doesn't think the same as me). On top of that it's a unique mash up, Edger Wright directing a psychological horror movie, how awesome is that.
  3. The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent - Nicolas Cage producing and starring in a movie about himself re-visiting his most iconic characters, do I even need to explain any further.
  4. MCU Spider-Man 3 - Like I said, this list is my own opinion, & in my opinion out of all the MCU movies and TV shows coming out in Phase 4, Spider-Man 3 is the second most anticipated out of all of them (I say second because...Well...you know...MARVEL's What if...?), & I think there's is a lot too look forward too, on the one hand it will continue from that awesome set up from FFH, with Spider-Man/Peter Parker now on the run after Mysterio framed him for what happened in London, & having to clear his name because of this, a concept I think would interesting exploring, especially since this means we can have villains like Kraven and Scorpion in the film, maybe Mysterio will even make a grand return, but on the other hand it also looks to be a Multiverse story featuring Tobey Maguire and Andrew Garfield's Spider-Man as well as Alfred Molina's Doc Ock, Jaime Foxx's Electro, and possibly even the OG MJ and Emma Stone's Gwen Stacy...Which is were my worries start to kick in, if you asked me how hyped I was for Spidey 3 before this Spider-verse news came out, it would probably be number 2 or tied with both Matrix 4 and Dune as my number 1 somehow, but now that has changed, & don't get me wrong. Seeing Maguire and Garfield as there respective versions of the Web head is freaking awesome & it'll be cool seeing Molina return to one of his more iconic performances and Foxx being given a second chance at playing Electro after having to play discount Doctor Manhatten/One Man Blue Man Group in that Abomination from 2014, but I do hope they focus more on the On the Run stuff and less on the Multiverse stuff, or at least find a way to blend them together in a way that feels organic, because I feel it's too early to do the Multiverse stuff and I kindof wanted to see a more grounded (no pun intended) Spidey on the Run story to be honest. But even with that being said, like I said, yeah, seeing Maguire and Garfield back as there respective Spider-men will still be pretty sweet, & I think if done right this film could find a way to organically combine the Multiverse story and Spidey on the Run story extremely well. That & I am just so hyped for MCU Spider-Man after Far From Home, I wasn't the biggest fan of Homecoming, but I absolutely loved FFH, & I am hyped for whatever MCU Spidey throws my way.
  5. Ridley Scott's The Last Duel - Not much on this one, but judging by the plot dealing with the last Duel to ever be recorded in France's history, & having a pretty decent cast and Legendary director Ridley Scott (and Directing something that ISN'T Alien related, thank god. I know it's his baby but Covenant was not the best movie ever made) I think this one is something worth having in the top five. Because, yeah, it does sound pretty interesting.
  6. Elvis - Not much to say here, just a big Elvis buff & I really want to see this Biopic, as I always wanted to see a Biopic about the king on the big screen. Especially when Tom Hanks is involved.
  7. A tie between The King's Man & The Suicide Squad - yep a tie, I'm sorry but that's just simply how I role. Let's start with James Gunn's the Suicide Squad, Unlike the last Suicide Squad film, this one is going to be directed by James Gunn, the same guy who directed Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 1 & 2, as well as 2011 Super. & from how the film looks not only does it look incredibly fun and over the top (right down to some of the costumes looking like they came straight out of the comics) but also it simply just looks incredible. I have huge faith in James Gunn, especially after the Guardians movies, & the simple fact he's willing to embrace the comic books and there obscurities. Now for The King's Man, this film just looks crazy and Insane, I am an absolute huge fan of the first Kingsman movie, the second movie was.....a movie to say the least, but this one looks like it'll be a fun ride. Especially with it being a prequel instead of an actual third movie, though I hope we get a third movie at some point.
  8. Raya and the Last Dragon - Not much to say here, the Animation looks incredible, the story sounds intriguing, and overall I think it could make for yet another great entry from Disney. Also it's a relieve to see something original after the wave of Live action remakes we have been getting.
  9. Godzilla vs Kong - Another personal pick, but for this one, it's just simply the final showdown we have all been waiting for, I have been a huge fan of Monsterverse so far, & I think it'll be amazing to see these two icons get the rematch they both rightfully deserve. Now hopefully Legendary and WB can work something out so not only can it actually be released, but also so it doesn't have to be delayed again.
  10. No Time to Die - I really loved two of the Daniel Craig Bond films (Casino Royale and Skyfall) the other two not so much (Quantum of Solace and Spectre) but hopefully this will lean on the good, if not great side, especially since the film looks fantastic so far.
Honorable Mentions:
submitted by darrylthedudeWayne to movies [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to oscarrace [link] [comments]

Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

505 books to read in quarantine for people who are bored af

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Kasimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to teenagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine If You’re Bored and Kinda Like Books (in No Particular Order)

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to cleanagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to booksuggestions [link] [comments]

RT Rundown June 6, 2020 - June 12, 2020

Last Week
This post lists everything Rooster Teeth has released from June 6, 2020 to June 12, 2020. The organization of this post follows the order of the links on the sidebar on the website. First exclusive content is surrounded in asterisks ( *EXAMPLE*) while content that is currently exclusive but will be available publicly later is followed by an asterisks and the date in which it will be free (EXAMPLE*Free June 20th.) This does not include content that will lose exclusivity on the day this post is made (June 13th.)
NEWS:
ROOSTER TEETH:
RT PODCAST #600 - Gavin is the Voice of Reason?
*RT PODCAST POST SHOW #600 - Seizure Warning*
ALWAYS OPEN #140 - Falling Asleep During 69
*STILL OPEN #140 - Inside, I Was Erect*
ALWAYS OPEN - Just the BOIs - Black Lives Matter
CHUMP #15 - WHO Was Almost Hit by a Train… TWICE?
*CHUMP CHANGE #15 - What Were the Odds*
GOOD MORNING FROM HELL - A Titanic Screw Up
BLACK BOX DOWN - Two Lightbulbs Cause Two Crashes
RT INBOX - Fish Race 2020
RT LIFE - Creating the ULTIMATE Chicken Nugget!
HARD MODE - Secret Palpatine w/ Achievement Hunter
RTTV SPECIALS - Changes - Community & Coffee
RT STREAMS - No Pain, No Gain -- with Blaine!
RT STREAMS - Gus & Chris Play With Airplanes - Sim Airport in the Red
RT STREAMS - Die Is Cast Ep. 05 - Dancing Blades and Zombie Hallways
RT STREAMS - Screen Time: Goldeneye
RT STREAMS - Dungeons & Animal Crossing
RT STREAMS - We Were Here Together
ACHIEVEMENT HUNTER:
HARDCORE MINI GOLF - Don’t Talk To Me About Friendship* Free June 17th
F**KFACE - Set Sail For Ass//Billy Ripken F**kfaced Himself
FACE JAM - TGI Fridays Loaded Cheese Fry Burger
AHWU #529 - We Need a Haircut
TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES - We Livestream A Catastrophic Failure
AH ANIMATED - Could You Fight 20 Cows With Your Bare Hands?
PLAY PALS - There’s Too Many Endings! - Please, Don’t Touch Anything!
LET’S ROLL - Are We Illegal Space Spies? - Spyfall - (Tabletop Simulator)
ROULETSPLAY - SOLO and a Guy: A Star Wars Story - Battlefront II
ACHIEVEMENT HUNTER - Creating a Comic Book with Greg Miller - Keeping the Lights On
ACHIEVEMENT HUNTER - Golf Mix - AH Remix
AH STREAMS - How You Can Support Creative POC - F-ing Around With Ify & Fiona
AH STREAMS - Portal 2
AH STREAMS - Astroneer
AH STREAMS - Apex
AH STREAMS - Super Smash Bros. Ultimate with Woolie and Shofu
AH STREAMS - Jackbag on PC! - GTA V
AH STREAMS - We Take to the Skies! - Gmod TTT
AH STREAMS - Role Initiative - Rage Against the Machine
AH STREAMS - You’ve Broken the Game! - Ultimate Chicken Horse
AH STREAMS - Don’t You Go Squishing Me! - Gears Tactics
AH STREAMS - Much Power. Many Cards! - Battlefront 2
AH STREAMS - Such Sad Boys - Post Team Does Batman: Telltale Series
LET’S PLAY - Busting Ghosts in Halo 3 LASO ODST (Part 7)* Free June 14th
LET’S PLAY - We Get Hardcore Soup’s - Golf With Your Friends
LET’S PLAY - We Get REKT! - Wreckfest
LET’S PLAY GTA V - Offense Defense With Cabs* Free June 15th
LET’S PLAY GMOD - Stopping Traitors With Pizza* Free June 17th
LET’S PLAY MINECRAFT - How to be a Hero? - Minecraft Explosion Mod Part 2* Free June 19th
FUNHAUS:
YOUR COMMENTS - Wheel of Humility: Your Comments Were Right!
DUDE SOUP #282 - What To Expect From Destiny 2: Beyond Light w/ Parris Lilly
MORNING HAUS - Good Morning, Winners
FILMHAUS - Why You Should Watch Star Wars: The Clone Wars Right Now!
FULLHAUS - Adam Tries To Speedrun Ori and the Will of the Wisps (UNCUT)
FULLHAUS - Who Needs Halo Infinite? (UNCUT) - Alienautics Gameplay
GAMEPLAY - Fatal Extraction - CSGO Co-op Adventures Mod w/ CrankGamePlays
GAMEPLAY - Pottermore Pileup - GTA Online Casino Heist Part 7
GAMEPLAY - Block Party - Minecraft Dungeons Gameplay
GAMEPLAY - Fire Up Your Dial Up For Runescape!
FUNHAUS LIVE - Minecraft Dungeons with Lindsey and The Gang!
ANIMATION:
RTAA - Buttz Mitzvah* Free June 15th
*TALK CRWBY TO ME - 50 shades of RWBY*
I HAVE NOTES - Can We Lower The Stakes?
CYPHERDEN’S ADVENTURES - MY DAD’S CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND
SELECT ALL - Animal Crossing Hide & Seek
SELECT ALL - RWBY Quick Draw: Sad Dads and Cute Girls
*BACKWARDZ COMPATIBLE - Dead by Daylight*
*BACKWARDZ COMPATIBLE - Games Done Quick at Home*
*BACKWARDZ COMPATIBLE - Willem Dafoe’s Lake Monster*
INSIDE GAMING:
IG PODCAST - Send News #15 - Game Companies Voice Support For #BlackLivesMatter
IG PODCAST - Send News #16 - PS5 Load Times Won’t Be A Game-Changer
IG ROUNDUP - CEO Calls Stadia A “Disappointment”
IG SPECIAL - Big Mutherf***in Crab Truckers Pt.1
IG FEATURES - The Magic of Sound Design In Games
IG DAILY - Stadia Takes Another Hit
IG DAILY - Xbox Knows Series X Will Fail?
IG DAILY - Nintendo Hacks Are Worse Than We Thought
IG DAILY - PS5 Still Plagued By Load Times?
IG DAILY - What’s Next For PS5?
IG LIVE! - “How Are You Doing?” & Difficult Conversations - Stay Zen with Kdin #9
IG LIVE! - Don’t F*** With My Cartoons - Model Employees
IG LIVE! - Hitman 2
IG LIVE! - Red Dead Redemption 2 Part 2
IG LIVE! - How To Draw Mario Good - Inside Gaming Teaches
IG LIVE! - Disintegration
DEATH BATTLE:
Wings of Iron Music Video
DBX - Mulan VS Lucina (Disney VS Fire Emblem)
DBX - Mulan VS Lucina Alternate Ending
DB CAST #182 - Could Shantae be in Death Battle!
*SUDDEN DEATH #182 - Chad goes to the Hospital!*
THE YOGSCAST:
TTT - SHE’S THE DOG DETECTIVE
TTT - ZYLUS NEVER LOSES
TTT - WE’RE THE DETECTIVE DEPUPEDE
GMOD SANDBOX - BEN DID SOMETHING REALLY BAD
TRIFORCE #130 - That American Life
HIGH ROLLERS: AEROIS #74 - Criminal Negotiations
SIMON’S PECULIAR PORTIONS - Woman’s First Date Turns Into Bank Robbery
KINDA FUNNY:
INTERNET EXPLORERZ - HOW IS THIS DUCK SO BIG?!?!
SCREENCAST #73 - What We’ve Been Watching
KF PODCAST #72 - All Of Funhaus Joins Us!
KF GAMES DAILY 06.08.20 - PlayStation 5 Event Rescheduled!
KF GAMES DAILY 06.09.20 - The Future of Destiny
KF GAMES DAILY 06.10.20 - Persona 4 Golden Heads to PC?!
KF GAMES DAILY 06.11.20 - Last Minute PS5 Bets, Predictions
KF LIVE REACTIONS - Destiny 2: Beyond Light
KF LIVE REACTIONS - PlayStation 5 Reveal
EVERY TRANSFORMERS MOVIE REVIEWED & RANKED - Transformers Dark of the Moon
EVERY TRANSFORMERS MOVIE REVIEWED & RANKED - Transformers Age of Extinction
FRIENDS OF RT:
SONGS ABOUT GAMES - Nicolas Cage Rap - “Uncaged”
DC DAILY June 8th, 2020 - It’s Sy Borgman!
DC DAILY June 9th, 2020 - Vote Yolanda!
DC DAILY June 10th, 2020 - “The Last God” RPG, Part 1 of 3
DC DAILY June 11th, 2020 - “The Last God” RPG, Part 2 of 3
DC DAILY June 12th, 2020 - “The Last God” RPG, Part 3 of 3
STORE:
ACHIEVEMENT HUNTER - Fore Honor T-Shirt
ACHIEVE - Racing Stripe Zip-Up Hoodie
ACHIEVE - Grand Pix Long Sleeve T-Shirt
ACHIEVE - Racing Decal Pack
ACHIEVE - Racing Pole Position T-Shirt
ACHIEVE - Racing Circuit T-Shirt
submitted by NotMarilee to roosterteeth [link] [comments]

(Selling)Disney/Marvel ( New Pixar 4k, Aladdin 4k Live/Animated, Avengers 1-4, Captain America 1-4, Iron Man 1-3, Thor 1-3) and 4k/HD (Star Trek 4k, Batman TAS, Matrix 4k and more) 100 + Title

Prefer Venmo or CashApp, but can accept Paypal also
Selling:
Arnold Schwarzenegger 6-film collection - (Total Recall, Last Stand, T2, RedHeat, Maggie, Hercules in NY )HD (Vudu) - $12
Batman The Animated Series Complete HD (VUDU) - $25
Nicolas Cage 6 - Movie Collection (Joe, Drive Angry, Bangkok Dangerous, Lord of War, Deadfall, and Knowing) HD (Vudu) - $10
Jurassic Park 5 Movie Collection 4k (MA) - $23
Predator 4 Movie Collection HD (MA) - $12
Predator 4 Movie Collection 4k (MA) - $20
Samuel Jackson 4 Movie Collection (The Spirit, Reasonable Doubt, Cell, Kite) HD (VUDU) - $9
Star Trek:Kelvin Trilogy 4k (iTunes) - $12
Taken 1-3 HD (MA) - $12

Batman and Robin (MA) - $7
Batman Hush (MA) - $9
Bumblebee (Vudu) - $5
Casino (MA) - $8
Creed 2 (Vudu) - $7
Deadpool 1 (iTunes, will port to MA) - $5
Despicable Me 2 (iTunes, will port to MA) - $5
Fate of the Furious (MA) - $4
Field of Dreams (MA) - $7
Interstellar (iTunes) - $5
Jason Bourne (iTunes, will port to MA) - $4
Joy (iTunes, will port to MA) - $5
Jurassic Park 3 (MA) - $6
Justice League (MA) - $6
Matrix Reloaded (MA) - $7
Matrix Revolutions (MA) - $7
Maze Runner:Scorch Trials (iTunes, will port to MA) - $5
Ocean's 8 (MA) - $7
Pet Semetary (1989) (iTunes) - $4
Pitch Perfect 1 (MA) - $6
Rocketman (Vudu) - $10
Snatched (iTunes, will port to MA) - $4
Snow White and the Huntsman (iTunes, will port to MA) - $4
The Meg (MA) - $6
Waterworld (MA) - $8
HD (Non-Disney)
All Nighter (MA) - $4
Age of Adeline (Vudu) - $4
Amazing Spiderman 2 (MA) - $5
American Sniper (MA) - $4
Argo (MA) - $4
Batman:Gotham by Gaslight (MA) - $5
Batman vs Superman:Dawn of Justice (Ultimate Edition) (MA) - $3
Book Club (iTunes) - $3
Bourne Legacy (MA) - $4
Dark Knight Rises (MA) - $4
Expendables 3 (Theatrical or Unrated) (Vudu) - $3
Fifty Shades of Grey (MA) - $4
Fifty Shades Darker (MA) - $4
Gravity (MA) - $4
Hunger Games (Vudu) - $4
Hunger Games:Catching Fire (VUDU) - $4
Hunger Games:Mockingjay part 1 (VUDU) - 44
Incredible Burt Wonderstone (MA) - $4
Jupiter Ascending (MA) - $4
Jurassic World:Fallen Kingdom (MA) - $4
Justice League:Judas Contract - $5
Lego Movie 2 (MA) - $5
Maze Runner:Death's Cure (MA) - $4
Monuments Men (MA) -4
King Kong 2006 (MA) - $4
Kung Fu Panda 3 (MA) - $5
Orange is the New Black Season 6 (Vudu) - $6
Pacific Rim 1 (MA) - $4
Predator (2018) (MA) - $4
Replica (Vudu or iTunes 4k) - $5
Rise of the Guardian (MA) - $4
Red Sparrow (MA) - $4
Rocketman (Vudu) - $6
Safe (Vudu) - $4
Secret Life of Walter Mitty (MA) - $4
Silver Lining Playbook (VUDU) - $4
Taken 3 (MA) - $4
Transformers Last Knight (Vudu) - $4
Witch (Vudu) - $5
GP (Google Play) HD Split Code
Adventures of Ichabod and Mr Toad - $4
Aladdin (Animated) - $5
Aladdin (Live Action) - $7
Alexander and the Terrible Horrible .. - $4
Ant Man and the Wasp - $5
Avengers 1 - $5
Avengers:Age of Ultron - $5
Avengers:Infinity War - $3
Avengers:Endgame - $5
Bambi - $6
Bambi 2 - $6
Beauty and the Beast (Animated) - $7
Beauty and the Beast (Live Action) - $3
BFG - $3
Black Panther - $4
Big Hero 6 - $6
Bolt - $6
Brave - $5
Bug's Life - $7
Captain America:First Avenger - $6
Captain America:Winter Soldier - $5
Captain America:Civil War - $5
Captain Marvel - $5
Cars 3 - $3
Christopher Robin - $5
Cinderella (Animated) - $6
Coco - $3
Disney Short Films Collection - $4
Dr Strange - $5
Dumbo (Animated) - $8
Dumbo (Live Action) - $5
Finding Dory - $4
Finding Nemo - $5
Fox and the Hound - $7
Fox and the Hound 2 - $3
Frozen - $5
Good Dinosaur - $4
Guardian of the Galaxy vol 2 - $3
Hercules - $7
Incredibles 1 - $6
Incredibles 2 - $4
Inside Out - $4
Iron Man 1 - $5
Iron Man 2 - $5
Iron Man 3 - $5
Jungle Book (Animated) - $8
Lady and the Tramp - $7
Lady and the Tramp 2 - $7
Lilo and Stitch 2 - $3
Lion King 1 1/12 - $5
Little Mermaid 2 - $7
Little Mermaid 3 - $7
Mary Poppins - $5
Mary Poppins Returns - $4
Mcfarland USA - $4
Million Dollar Arm - $4
Moana - $5
Monsters University - $7
Mulan 2 - $3
Muppets Most Wanted - $5
Nutcracker and the Four Realms - $4
Olaf's Frozen Adventure - $4
Pete's Dragon - $3
Peter Pan - $7
Pirate Fairy - $4
Pirates of Caribbean:Dead Men Tell No Tales - $3
Planes - $4
Planes Fire and Rescue - $4
Princess and the Frog - $7
Pocahontas - $7
Queen of Katwe - $4
Ralph Breaks the Internet - $4
Ratatouille- $6
Snow White - $6
Star Wars:Force Awakens - $5
Star Wars:Last Jedi - $4
Star Wars: Rogue One - $2
Star Wars: Solo - $5
Sword in the Stone - $6
Tarzan - $7
Tinkerbell:Legend of the Neverbeast - $5
Tomorrowland - $4
Thor 1 - $5
Thor 2 - $5
Thor Ragnarok - $4
Toy Story 3 - $5
Wall-e - $7
Wreck it Ralph - $7
Wrinkle in Time - $3
Zootopia - $6
Disney Split MA (Movies Anywhere) HD Codes - Does not include DMR unless stated
Disney Split MA (Movies Anywhere) 4k Codes - Does not include DMR unless stated
Aladdin (Animated) - $10
Ant Man and the Wasp - $9
Avengers 1 - $9
Avengers:Age of Ultron - $9
Avengers:Infinity Wars - $8
Avengers Endgame - $9
Brave - $10
Captain America:Winter Soldier - $10
Captain Marvel - $9
Cinderella (Live) - $8
Coco - $8
Dumbo - $8
FInding Nemo - $10
Good Dinosaur - $10
Inside Out - $10
Iron Man 2 - $10
Iron Man 3 - $10
Lion King - $9
Little mermaid - $11
Nutcracker and the Four Realms - $8
Ralph Breaks the Internet - $7
Ratatouille - $10
Thor 1 - $10
Thor 2 - $10
Toy Story 1 - $9
Toy Story 3 - $9
submitted by IamtheZZ to DigitalCodeSELL [link] [comments]

What's Happening in CT - 1/24/20 - 1/26/20

Friday, January 24th, 2020:


Saturday, January 25th, 2020:

Sunday, January 26th, 2020:

Find more things to do here!

Check out a newly released movie such as:

submitted by SheCalledMePaul to Connecticut [link] [comments]

How does one describe Brian De Palma?

How does one describe Brian De Palma?

De Palma
How does one describe Brian De Palma? Many have accused him of being a misogynist for his films’ violent behavior towards women in thrillers such as Blow Out or Dressed to Kill. Others have commented that De Palma is just a knock-off of Hollywood legend Alfred Hitchcock, as De Palma uses similar formal techniques and even story ideas from classics like Rear Window or Psycho. Though many of De Palma’s movies have become significant within pop culture, most have nevertheless generated controversy for their recurrent use of graphic violence, themes of obsession, and voyeurism. Even if these criticisms of De Palma were entirely true, there’s no denying that his talent as a director or his widespread influence on other filmmakers. Indeed, Brian De Palma has proven again and again over his decades-long career to be one of cinema’s finest provocateurs, fascinated with how people can manipulate images and how those images can, in turn, affect others.
From the beginning of his filmography, De Palma has shown a fierce fascination with cinema and the art of creating images. His first feature in 1968, Murder a la Mod, features a young amateur filmmaker who shoots a cheap pornographic movie to make quick money. De Palma’s formal style itself shows the director’s love for the image; most of his films feature carefully choreographed long shots, split-screens of two separate places, and split-diopter shots that close in on an object or person in the foreground while also maintaining focus on something else in the background. Even De Palma’s recently released thriller Domino, despite a severely cut-down narrative, contains a shocking split-screen sequence that examines how recorded images of violence can easily spread online and thus turn into propaganda
De Palma’s earliest films were low-budget features shot in or around New York City. Three of these starred a young Robert De Niro, who was also beginning to make a name for himself in the film industry. The last and most famous of these early collaborations, Hi, Mom! (1970), was a dark comedy that introduced the themes of voyeurism and images that would become staples of De Palma’s later filmography. De Niro stars as Jon Rubin, a young man returning from Vietnam who has an idea to put a camera outside his window and film people in apartments across the street. Rubin at first gets financial help from an adult film producer and shoots footage of a middle-class family, a rich young playboy, and a college student involved with a black radical group. Rubin even decides to “create” films himself; he seduces a young woman in one of the apartments he spies on and has sex with her in her apartment after setting his camera to start recording after a certain time. Through Rubin, we see not only De Palma’s fascination with vouyerism (there are long sequences of each apartment and its inhabitants, some shots sped up for humor) but also with cinema itself. The girl Rubin dates and seduces on-camera is unaware she’s an actress in a film, showing how much deception inherently goes into making cinema.
The most famous scene of Hi, Mom! occurs after Rubin is fired. Desperately looking for easy money, he gets hired by the black radical group to play a part in a experimental theatrical performance, Be Black, Baby. Shot entirely on 16mm film, the sequence involves several wealthy white audience members going to the production set in an empty apartment building. The black actors running the show make the white people eat soul food and paint their faces black while they don whiteface. From there, the white audience members are terrorized and chased from room to room by the actors as an attempt for the white patrons to understand the “black experience.” Rubin plays a policeman who comes in at the end of the performance to further scare the audience before chasing them out of the building. At the end, the stunned white audience praises the show; the black actors are disappointed and one sourly remarks, “I don’t think they learned a thing.” Though the extended scene is also a hilarious satire of the New York underground theater movement, it also serves as another example of cinema as manipulation. Because of the intense performances by the black actors and Rubin, the white patrons are deceived into thinking they are in serious danger and forget that they are part of a performance until they are let free and given time to calm down.
After a string of successes in the 1970s including Phantom of the Paradise and Carrie, De Palma made several studio films in the 1980s, some highly commercial (Scarface, The Untouchables) and some were more personal psychological thrillers. Body Double, made immediately after Scarface was negatively received by critics and gained controversy for its graphic violence, was released as a bitter response to Hollywood animosity and was a twisted homage to Hitchcock’s Rear Window and Vertigo. After he catches his girlfriend cheating on him, unemployed actor Jake Scully (Craig Wasson) decides to house-sit for Sam (Gregg Henry) for several days. At the house before leaving, Sam shows Scully a telescope where he watches a neighbor (Deborah Shelton) do a seductive dance alone every night. Scully quickly becomes fascinated with the neighbor and begins stalking her around Los Angeles during the day. One night, Scully watches the neighbor become brutally murdered by a mysterious, disfigured man; he later discovers that the woman he saw each night dancing was a porn actress, Holly Body (Melanie Griffith), hired by Sam to make sure Scully would watch every night. Sam — wearing a mask to look like the disfigured man — killed the real neighbor, his wife Gloria, and used Scully as the perfect alibi.
Body Double is one of De Palma’s most unnerving works, examining our relationship to cinema and how audiences expectations can subjectively affect the images they see. Sam chooses Scully to become an unknowing witness because he knows Scully has recently lost his girlfriend and is lonely. Indeed, Scully projects his sexual desires on to the dancing woman, even following Gloria around as she shops in a mall or walks to the beach. Scully’s voyeuristic act of watching through a telescope implicates us the viewers as well, as we too become an audience to Holly’s erotic dance. After Gloria’s murder, a distraught Scully watches a porn channel and sees Holly doing the same dance she did for him in the window. From here on, Scully transforms from a passive audience member into an active participant; he auditions for a music video with Holly and introduces himself to her as a porn producer as a way to get the truth out of her. The music video itself — set to Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s single “Relax” — is a film within a film — as Scully plays a man wandering through a strip club and eventually seduced by Holly. Both within and without Body Double, we clearly see how cinema and its imagery can manipulate us, yet there is still a part of us that allows us to get tricked and deceived every time.
One of De Palma’s last Hollywood-funded movies, Snake Eyes was given negative reviews from critics and audiences alike, but it remains an essential De Palma film. Detective Rick Santoro (Nicolas Cage) goes to an Atlantic City boxing match to help guard the Secretary of Defense alongside an old friend Kevin Dunne (Gary Sinise), now a U.S. Navy Commander. When the Secretary gets fatally shot, the arena closes down and Santoro searches for suspects who might have been involved in a larger conspiracy. Most of the film is shown through Rashomon-style flashbacks; Santoro hears stories from different people about where they were and what they were doing when the shooting took place. Yet, Santoro soon realizes some of the statements he’s been given contradicts others — the recollections of witness Julia (Carla Gugino) reveal that Dunne’s story was fabricated and that he was part of the plan to kill the Secretary.
Much of Snake Eyes revolves around the objectivity of the surveillance camera as opposed to the memories of individuals. The film opens on newsreel footage of a storm outside the match and moves from one television to another. Santoro is first seen standing next to a pay-per-view reporter shown on a television and then moves off of the television screen and on to our own. Santoro only believes Julia’s story when he sees footage of Dunne meeting with the shooter minutes before the Secretary’s death. De Palma seems to recognize that a camera recording by itself is unbiased, but those images can easily be changed or constructed to show or hide the truth. When Dunne erases the surveillance video, the camera moves to a different news screen where corrupt casino owner Gilbert Powell (John Heard) lies to reporters about how the Secretary of Defense was killed. The Secretary of Defense was killed because Julia, a military manufacturer analyst, told him that the results of a new missile guard system supported by Dunne and Powell were faked so he would approve its use. Here, one can see a significant change in De Palma’s examination of imagery. In Hi, Mom!, Rubin comically seduces a woman to create an adult film; Sam creates the image of Holly’s dance to get away with murder in Body Double. On the other hand, images are erased or manipulated by military officials and corporation executives for large profits in Snake Eyes. The institutional corruption discovered by Santoro is so vast and widespread that De Palma’s original ending to the film (the casino washing away entirely in the midst of the hurricane) makes much more sense.
De Palma’s filmography of the last 20 years has been mostly independently financed and hasn’t received the same distribution or success as his previous work. Domino is the best example; De Palma had trouble with producers during filming, and a 140-minute rough cut of the film got shortened to the 89-minute version being released this week. Yet, despite all these troubles, there are still sequences within Domino that demonstrate De Palma’s artistry just as much in Body Double or Snake Eyes. No other filmmaker has so thoroughly examined our relationship with cinema and how its artificiality can deceive us. Even in his late 70s, De Palma is still thinking about how images can be manipulated, and in turn, manipulate an idea more relevant than ever in a world filled with billions of cellphones and a limitless global network.
Brian De Palma: Obsessed with the Image By Ethan Cartwright
submitted by Carlislegendary to TrueFilm [link] [comments]

MCU Movies Behind the Scenes Facts *Wanted to do this for fun* Day 1: Iron Man

So i'm going to go on IMDB and look at each MCU movies behind the scenes facts and POST THE MOST INTERESTING ONES here, I will post each movie a day instead of what I did before where I did 10 posts, I will start with the first Iron Man today and each day will be the next MCU movie after it, ending with Guardians 3, if people like this and want me to do the Netflix shows, Agents of Shield and Agent Carter, please let me know...OK....let's start

IRON MAN

1. The script was not completely finished when filming began, since the filmmakers were more focused on the story and the action, so the dialogue was mostly ad-libbed throughout filming. Director Jon Favreau acknowledged this made the film feel more natural. Some scenes were shot with two cameras, to capture lines improvised on the spot. Robert Downey, Jr. would ask for many takes of one scene, since he wanted to try something new. Gwyneth Paltrow, on the other hand, had a difficult time trying to match Downey with a suitable line, as she never knew what he would say.

2. Paul Bettany has never seen the film, and is unfamiliar with the plot. He said J.A.R.V.I.S. was the easiest job ever, and it was almost like a robbery, since he only worked for two hours, got paid a lot of money, then went on vacation with his wife (Jennifer Connelly).

3. Agent Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) was originally a much smaller part. In fact, the character at first was only called "Agent", and as filming went on, and it became apparent with Gregg's chemistry with all the other cast members, they added more and more scenes.

4. Director Jon Favreau wanted Robert Downey, Jr. because he felt the actor's past was right for the part. He commented: "The best and worst moments of Robert's life have been in the public eye. He had to find an inner balance to overcome obstacles that went far beyond his career. That's Tony Stark. Robert brings a depth that goes beyond a comic book character having trouble in high school, or can't get the girl." Favreau also felt Downey could make Stark "a likable asshole", but also depict an authentic emotional journey once he won over the audience.

5. To avoid spoilers about the final press conference, the extras were told that it was a dream sequence.

6. Tony Stark's computer system is called J.A.R.V.I.S. (Just A Rather Very Intelligent System). This is a tribute to Edwin Jarvis, Howard Stark's butler. He was changed to an artificial intelligence to avoid comparisons to Bruce Wayne's butler Alfred Pennyworth.

7. This is Marvel Studios' first self-financed movie.

8. In an interview with Britain's Empire Magazine, Robert Downey, Jr. thanked Burger King for helping him get straight in 2003, with a car full of drugs. He had a burger that was so disgusting, it made him rethink his life, and dump the drugs in the ocean. He repeats this, with his impromptu sit-down session with the press, upon his return from captivity. Burger King also promoted the film with toys based on this movie, as well as the sequel.

9. Jeff Bridges said he felt really uncomfortable not having a script or rehearsals, since normally he is very prepared, and knows his lines to the "T". But realizing it was like he was in a "two hundred million dollar student film" took the pressure off of him, and made it fun.

10. The Iron Man (1966) theme track can be heard in the film on several occasions: in the casino, in Stark's bedroom, and as Rhodey's ringtone.

11. Roughly four hundred fifty separate pieces make up the Iron Man suit.

12. To prepare for his role as Iron Man, Robert Downey, Jr. spent five days a week weight training and practiced martial arts to get into shape.

13. The roadster on which Tony Stark was working is owned by director Jon Favreau.

14. According to Paul Bettany, he did not know on which film he was working. He merely did the job as a favor for Jon Favreau, with whom he worked, in Wimbledon (2004).

15. This is the last film special effects expert Stan Winston completed before his death.

16. Jon Favreau celebrated getting the job as director by going on a diet and losing seventy pounds.

17. Four hundred extras were meant to be filmed standing at Tony Stark's press conference, but Robert Downey, Jr. suggested they ought to sit down, as that would be more realistic and comfortable.

18. Stan Lee, the creator of Iron Man, had originally based Tony Stark on Howard Hughes, who he felt was "one of the most colorful men of our time: an inventor, an adventurer, a multimillionaire, a ladies man, and finally, a nutcase." Robert Downey, Jr. further described his portrayal of Stark as "a challenge of making a wealthy, establishmentarian, weapons-manufacturing, hard-drinking, womanizing prick, into a character who is likeable, and a hero."

19. An early draft of the script revealed Tony Stark to be the creator of Dr. Otto Octavius' tentacles from Spider-Man 2 (2004). Octavius is a villain from the Spider-Man comic, but at the time, this wouldn't have been allowed, as Sony was the film rights holder to Spider-Man. However, Sony and Marvel agreed to share the film rights to the character in 2015, with Spider-Man/Peter Parker (Tom Holland) first appearing in Captain America: Civil War (2016), where he's introduced to Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.). Downey reprised his role in future Marvel Cinematic Universe films alongside Tom Holland as Peter ParkeSpider-Man.

20. Jon Favreau shot the film in California, because he felt that too many superhero films were set on the East Coast, especially New York City. As of May 2018, only seven of the nineteen films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe have featured New York City in some capacity. These being The Incredible Hulk (2008), Captain America: The First Avenger (2011), The Avengers (2012), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015); Doctor Strange (2016), Spider-Man: Homecoming (2017), and Avengers: Infinity War (2018).

21. For the first three Iron Man movies, director Jon Favreau thought of making the Iron Monger the main villain of the second film. Stane was going to be Stark's friend and confidante in the first film, but then would become his enemy in the second installment. However, Favreau was worried how to handle The Mandarin, who was to be the villain of the first film, so he decided to re-work the character into a behind-the-scenes presence, and make Iron Monger the first villain.

22. (At around one hour and fifty minutes) Just before the final press conference, Tony Stark is reading the newspaper with a grainy, amateur photograph of Iron Man on the cover. The picture is part of a video, shot by onlookers hiding in a bush during initial filming, that appeared on the Internet in 2007.

23. (At around one hour and twenty-five minutes) When Pepper discovers Tony removing the damaged Iron Man armor, Captain America's shield is on a workbench. This same scene was shown in many trailers, but the image of the shield was edited out.

24. (At around fifty-eight minutes) Obadiah Stane plays on the piano a musical piece written by eighteenth century composer Antonio Salieri. Salieri is best known as a jealous rival of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and was said to have murdered Mozart (although historical records have proven that, on the contrary, both had collaborated on, and promoted each other's work on several occasions). This serves as an appropriate parallel of Stark and Stane's relationship in the film.

25. Gwyneth Paltrow only needed to travel fifteen minutes to get to the studio. She claimed that this is a part of the reason she took the role, as she could be home with her two children during the entire shoot.

26. To prepare for his role as Obadiah Stane, Jeff Bridges read some of the "Iron Man" comic books that featured Stane. He also grew a beard and shaved his head, which he said was something he'd always wanted to do.

27. There are about five sets of armor in the film, all inspired from the "Iron Man" comics: Mark I armor, Stark's first suit, is a simple suit constructed of iron. Mark II armor is a silver suit, the prototype Stark develops (this can also be counted as the War Machine armor, as Rhodes looks speculatively at it). Mark III armor is the final red and gold armor. J.A.R.V.I.S. first presents the Mark III armor in full gold, the look pays tribute to the all-gold "Golden Avenger" armor Iron Man wore early in his career. J.A.R.V.I.S. later presents the armor in silver and red, making it look almost identical to Iron Man's "Silver Centurion" armor that he wore in the 1980s.

28. During the final battle, there was originally going to be a sequence where Tony, in the Iron Man suit, drives an Audi R8 that would crash into Iron Monger's legs then flip over, after which Iron Man would split the car in half and jump out. However, the Audi R8 was so well-built, that it refused to flip, despite repeated crashes and the roof wouldn't split the way director Jon Favreau wanted it to, because the car's frame was so tough. As a result, the whole final fight sequence was re-written. The filmmakers were so impressed by the toughness of the car, that it was decided that the convertible version was to be featured in Iron Man 2 (2010).

29. (At around one hour and forty-five minutes) During the highway battle with Iron Monger, a building can be seen in the background with a Roxxon logo. In the Marvel Universe, Roxxon is a notorious conglomerate known for illegal activities, agents of which were responsible for the deaths of Stark's parents.

30. During pre-production, Robert Downey, Jr. set up an office next to Jon Favreau's office, to discuss his role with him, and to be more involved in the film's screenwriting.

31. It took approximately seventeen years to get the film into development. Originally, Universal Pictures was to produce the film in April 1990. They later sold the rights to Twentieth Century Fox. Later, Fox sold the rights to New Line Cinema. Finally, Marvel Studios decided to handle their own creation.

32. Jeff Bridges, hearing that Obadiah was a Biblical name, researched the Book of Obadiah in the Bible, and was surprised to learn that a major theme in that particular book is retribution, which Obadiah Stane represents. However, the name "Obadiah" means "servant and worshiper of the Lord", which Stane obviously isn't.

33. In the comics, Obadiah Stane ran his own company (Stane International), and was actually a business rival to Tony Stark, rather than being part of Stark Enterprises.

34. Agent Phil Coulson repeatedly states he is a member of the "Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division" (finally shortening it to S.H.I.E.L.D.). In the comics, the S.H.I.E.L.D. Agency originally stood for the "Supreme Headquarters, International Espionage/Law-Enforcement Division", then in 1991, it was revised to the "Strategic Hazard Intervention/Espionage Logistics Directorate".

35. An early draft of the script had the Mandarin appear in the film, re-imagined as an Indonesian terrorist.

36. The production met with about thirty different writers, and they all passed, as most of them felt that Iron Man was a relatively obscure character in the Marvel universe. They were also a bit nervous about working for an untried studio better known for producing comic books. Even the re-writes led to many refusals.

37. In the comics, Tony Stark participated (and became Iron Man) in the Vietnam War. Later, this was changed to the Gulf War. In this film, the character's origin was changed to Afghanistan, as director Jon Favreau did not wish to make the film a period piece, but instead give it a realistic contemporary look.

38. Gwyneth Paltrow based her performance on 1940s heroines (who she claimed were sexy, witty, and innocent all at once).

39. In the Ultimate Marvel Comics series, the character of Nick Fury is portrayed as African-American, with his look and personality tailored after Samuel L. Jackson, all carried out with Jackson's explicit permission. During one of the Ultimate Avengers issues, while discussing the possibility of a movie being made about them, and which actors would play which heroes, Nick Fury comments that nobody else but Samuel L. Jackson could play him. Jackson, himself a comic book fan, played Fury in this movie. Later on, the popularity of this character led Marvel to introduce this character into the mainstream comics as "Nick Fury, Jr.", the son of the original Nick Fury, in a move to work towards retiring the original from the mainstream universe.

40. According to Jon Favreau, when making this film, there was a lot of pressure for it to succeed. This was particularly due to Marvel using their characters as collateral when they received a five hundred twenty-five million dollar, seven year deal, called a non-recourse debt facility, allowing them to make original films based on their properties. Marvel wanted to have complete creative control over their characters, build a film library, and greater profit potential than the deals they've inked with other studios owning the film rights to their characters. Marvel also changed its name to Marvel Entertainment, Incorporated, to establish a Hollywood presence. If the film didn't succeed, Marvel would've lost the intellectual property rights to their library.

41. Rachel McAdams was Jon Favreau's first choice to play Pepper Potts, but she turned the role down. She played a role in Doctor Strange (2016).

42. The Iron Man Mark I armor weighed ninety pounds.

43. An animatronic puppet of the Iron Monger was built for the film by Stan Winston Studios. It stood ten feet tall, and weighed eight hundred pounds, and was built on a set of gimbals, to simulate walking. It required five operators to run it.

44. According to Jon Favreau, Clive Owen, and Sam Rockwell are among the actors that were considered for Tony Stark during pre-production. Rockwell played Stark's rival Justin Hammer in Iron Man 2 (2010).

45. Chapter One of Phase One in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

46. Hugh Jackman was offered the role of Tony Stark.

47. According to Terrence Howard, he and Robert Downey, Jr. competed physically on the set: "I'm forty to fifty pounds heavier than him, so I'm lifting and I push up about two hundred twenty-five, and knocked it out ten times. Robert wanted to go about two hundred thirty-five, and he did it, so I pushed it up to about two hundred forty-five. Robert and his competitive ass almost tore my shoulder trying to keep up with him!"

48. The cave that imprisons Tony Stark was a one hundred fifty to two hundred yard-long set, which had built-in movable forks, to allow greater freedom for the film's crew. It also had an air conditioning system installed, as production designer J. Michael Riva had learned that remote caves are actually very cold.

49. This was the first in a planned six-picture deal between Marvel and Paramount, before the acquisition of Marvel by Disney, which transferred the distribution rights of The Avengers (2012) and Iron Man 3 (2013) to Disney, while Paramount kept the rights to Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), and Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) until Disney acquired them.

50. To prepare for her role as Pepper Potts, Gwyneth Paltrow asked Marvel to send her any comics to aid her understanding of the character.

51. For some of the shots of the first incarnation of the Iron Man suit, director Jon Favreau performed the motion capture.

52. Rock guitarist Tom Morello assisted Ramin Djawadi in composing the film's soundtrack. Morello had a cameo in the film as an Insurgent who gets killed when Tony Stark escapes the cave (perhaps fittingly, since Morello is a member of the band Rage Against the Machine).

53. Originally, Iron Man's archnemesis, the Mandarin, was going to be the film's villain, but Jon Favreau felt him to be too fantastic and dated, so he was re-written into a "working-behind-the-scenes" presence. Favreau cited "Star Wars" as a case: "I looked at the Mandarin more like how in 'Star Wars' you had the Emperor, but Darth Vader is the guy you want to see fight. Then you work your way to the time when lightning bolts are shooting out of the fingers, and all that stuff could happen. But you can't have what happened in Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983) happen in Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977)."

54. (At around one hour and forty minutes) In the film, Rhodey (Terrence Howard) looks at the Mark II armor and says "Next time, baby!" hinting at War Machine, Rhodey's alter-ego. An animation of a War Machine suit, with a Gatling gun attached to a shoulder, can be seen in the closing credits. War Machine appeared in Iron Man 2 (2010), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), and Avengers: Infinity War (2018). However, in those films the role of James Rhodes was played by Don Cheadle.

55. In the comics, the chauffeur, Harold "Happy" Hogan, is a confidante of Tony Stark, who later marries Virginia "Pepper" Potts, after a tragedy draws them closer, though they later divorce. Additionally, the origin of Happy's nickname in the comics, is that he was a former professional boxer who earned that nickname, due to his reputation of never fighting back.

56. When Robert Downey, Jr. was carrying out motion-capture work on the film, he would sometimes wear the helmet, sleeves, and chest of the Iron Man armor over the motion-capture suit, to realistically portray Iron Man's movements.

57. In October 1999, Quentin Tarantino was approached to write and direct the film. Later, Joss Whedon, a big fan of the comic book, was in negotiations to direct the film in June 2001. In December 2004, Nick Cassavetes was hired as a director, with the film to release in 2006, but everything fell through. Finally, Jon Favreau was hired as director in April 2006.

58. (At around forty-seven minutes) Obadiah Stane tells Tony Stark "We're iron mongers, we make weapons." Stane's supervillain moniker is the Iron Monger, and thus foreshadows Stane's own transition in the film to an armor-clad antagonist.

59. First film released in 2008 to pass the $300 million mark at the U.S. box-office.

60. One of the cars in Tony Stark's garage, is a Tesla Roadster, which had not yet been released during the film's production.

61. (At around thirty-four minutes) The code that appears on the computer screen is a utility that downloads firmware into Lego robotic toy (called RCX). It may suggest that Tony Stark used this program to download firmware into his robotic suit.

62. The sound used during a target lock-on in Iron Man's Head Up Display (HUD) is the sound of the laser cannon firing in Space Invaders (1978) video game.

63. There are various references in the film to the Mandarin, Iron Man's archnemesis: -The organization that kidnaps Stark is called "the Ten Rings", after the ten rings that comprise the Mandarin's arsenal (Jon Favreau has stated that The Ten Rings, in fact, works for The Mandarin). -Commandant Raza speaks of Genghis Khan and Asia. -Commandant Raza is seen occasionally fiddling with an ornate gold ring. -The rings are worn by Stark, Stane, Rhodes, and Raza (that is to say those in positions of power).

63. According to Jon Favreau, it was difficult to find a proper opponent for Iron Man to face, since he wanted the film to remain grounded in reality as much as possible. It was decided to have a foe in the film who would serve as a parallel of Stark (for example, an armored opponent). Well-known enemies like the Titanium Man and the Crimson Dynamo were considered, but finally the lesser-known Iron Monger, Obadiah Stane, was chosen as Iron Man's adversary (Stane, as well as possessing his own armor, is also a business contemporary of Stark).

64. "I am Iron Man" was ad-libbed by Robert Downey, Jr. Producer Kevin Feige approved using it in the final cut of the film, and credits this with his decision to largely do away with secret identities in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Only Spider-Man conceals his identity, while Thor's alter ego, Donald Blake, is similarly not used.

65. (At around fifty-eight minutes) Obadiah brings Tony a pizza from New York City in a box marked "Ray's". Ray's is a famous chain of pizza places in New York City. It also marks the second Favreau-directed film to refer to Ray's Pizza. In Elf (2003), it is the pizza recommended by Santa Claus to Buddy the Elf.

66. As a tribute to Howard Hughes, who inspired Iron Man, production was mainly based in the former Hughes Company soundstages in Playa Vista. The scene where the Iron Man Mark III armor was created was filmed in the area where Hughes assembled the H-4 Hercules airplane (better known as "The Spruce Goose").

67. (At around one hour and forty minutes) When Tony Stark tells Rhodey to "keep the skies clear" before going to confront Obadiah Stane, Rhodey looks to the silver Mark II suit before saying "next time, baby". Rhodey (played by Don Cheadle) donned this suit in Iron Man 2 (2010), becoming War Machine.

68. Christine Everhart (Leslie Bibb) works for Vanity Fair in the movie, but in the comics, she works for the Daily Bugle.

69. Nicolas Cage and Tom Cruise were interested in playing Iron Man. Cruise, in particular was going to act in, and produce the film. Cage played another Marvel superhero in Ghost Rider (2007).

70. Jon Favreau was originally going to direct Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) in the manner of a superhero comedy adventure, but he instead chose to direct this film and give it a more serious tone. Ironically, Nick Cassavetes, who was chosen to direct that film, had been filled in to direct this film in December 2004.

71. The climactic showdown in the film, with Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man, facing Obadiah Stane, a.k.a. Iron Monger, is based on Iron Man #200 (November 1986). A face-off occurs between Stane's larger, more powerful Iron Monger and Stark's greater experience, and an exploding reactor appears. However, the comic concludes with Stane committing suicide with a repulsor ray blast to the head.

72. Jon Favreau advised composer Ramin Djawadi to keep the core of the music on heavy guitar, which he felt suited Iron Man best. Djiwadi composed the music on a heavy guitar before arranging it for the orchestra to perform.

73. This is the only Marvel Cinematic Universe film, and the only Iron Man film, that does not feature any martial-arts fights. It is also the first of two Marvel Cinematic Universe films in which Robert Downey, Jr. (Iron Man) appeared, but doesn't show off his skills in the Wing Chun fighting style.

74. Most of the exterior scenes set in Afghanistan were filmed at Olancha Sand Dunes. There, the crew had to endure two days of forty to sixty mile per hour winds.

75. Jon Favreau wanted Tony Stark and Pepper Potts' relationship to be like a 1940s comedy along the lines of His Girl Friday (1940).

76. Tony Stark drives an Audi R8 in the film, as part of a promotional deal Marvel Studios made with the Audi Automobile Company. Two other vehicles, the Audi S5 Coupe, and the Audi Q7 SUV, also make an appearance in the film.

77. (At around one hour and four minutes) Adi Granov designed a billboard poster of Iron Man's nemesis, the alien dragon Fin Fang Foom, for the film. This poster can be seen when Stark, while testing the Mark II armor, flies straight down a road (on Stark's left side).

78. The Industrial Light & Magic animators studied skydivers performing in a vertical wind tunnel, to create Iron Man's aerial movements. Iron Man was also animated to take off slowly and land quickly, to make those movements more realistic.

79. This is the first film set in, and the beginning of, the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

80. When Pepper Potts is downloading a set of secret files, the authorization on one document is listed as "Lebowski". Jeff Bridges, who plays Stane in this film, played "The Dude" in The Big Lebowski (1998).

81. (At around one hour and twenty-one minutes) The pilots in the F-22 jets are codenamed "Whiplash 1" and "Whiplash 2". In the Ultimate Iron Man comics, Whiplash is a super villain who possesses a pair of gloves with steel wires attached that acted as whips. Whiplash appeared in Iron Man 2 (2010).

82. According to Ramin Djawadi, Tony Stark's different moods, as performed by Robert Downey, Jr., was the inspiration for the Iron Man scores in the film.

83. The leader of the Ten Rings is named Raza, after a Marvel Comics character. However, the comic version of Raza is not an enemy of Iron Man, but an alien cyborg, who is a member of the space pirate gang known as the Starjammers. The only similarity they share, is their facial disfigurement. In the comics, Raza has implants on the left side of his face, while in the film, Raza is scarred on the right side of his face.

84. Comic book writers Mark Millar, Brian Michael Bendis, Joe Quesada, Tom Brevoort, Axel Alonzo, and Ralph Macchio were commissioned by Jon Favreau to give advice on the script.

85. An early draft of the script had Howard Stark, Iron Man's father, as a ruthless industrialist who becomes War Machine.

86. (At around one hour and twenty-four minutes) When Obadiah Stane (Jeff Bridges) watches Rhodey (Terrence Howard) on television, an expensive chess set is visible on the table in front of him. In the comics, Obadiah Stane was fond of playing chess, and also created a group called "The Chessmen" to attack Stark Industries.

87. Clark Gregg (Agent Phil Coulson) stated in the DVD commentary of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (2013), Season One, Episode Eleven, "The Magical Place", that he and Gwyneth Paltrow have known each other since she was nineteen-years-old.

88. According to the January 2012 Air & Space Magazine, Tony Starks's character was also inspired by South African born SpaceX (and PayPal co-founder), Elon Musk. A statue of Iron Man, complete with company ID, "stands guard" at SpaceX, along with a current version Cylon.

89. Jon Favreau played a character similar to Tony Stark, named Pete Becker, on Friends (1994). Stark and Becker are rich playboys, who give up their current life to fight, Tony fights crime, while Pete fights in Ultimate Fighting. Favreau even sported Stark-like facial hair for the role.

90. During filming, a tank accidentally ran over an Aaton 35mm camera.

91. To prepare for his role as James Rhodes, Terrence Howard visited the Nellis Air Force Base on March 16, 2007, where he ate with the base's airmen and observed the routines of HH-60 Pave Hawk rescue helicopters and F-22 Raptor jets.

92. Director Jon Favreau described the film as "a kind of independent film-espionage thriller crossbreed; a Robert Altman-directed Superman (1978), with shades of Tom Clancy novels, James Bond films, RoboCop (1987), and Batman Begins (2005)."

93. All three sets of Iron Man's armor were designed by Adi Granov, a comic book artist from the "Iron Man" comic, and Phil Saunders. They were then constructed by Stan Winston Studios.

94. Jon Favreau chose Industrial Light & Magic to provide the film's visual effects after watching Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (2007) and Transformers (2007).

95. (At around one hour and fifty-five minutes) Shortly into the end credits sequence, there is an animation of the Ten Rings logo. This refers to the terrorist group that captures Tony Stark early in the film, but is not actually acknowledged. It is, however, commonly acknowledged in Iron Man 3 (2013).

96. Timothy Olyphant read for the role of Tony Stark.

97. (At around one hour and two minutes) When Iron Man first takes flight, he travels at 0.29 Mach (two hundred twenty miles per hour) over California.

98. Production designer J. Michael Riva researched on objects found in prison which could be improvised and used for other purposes (for instance a sock used to make tea), to provide more verisimilitude to the film.

99. The Stark Industries logo is similar to that of Lockheed Martin, co-developer of the F-22 Raptor.

100. To create the shots of Iron Man against the F-22 Raptors, cameras were flown in the air to provide reference for the dynamics of wind and frost at that altitude.

101. Jon Favreau was inspired to cast Robert Downey, Jr. as Tony Stark/Iron Man after seeing his performance in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005). Shane Black, who wrote and directed Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005), co-wrote and directed Iron Man 3 (2013).

102. Harry Gregson-Williams was offered the job of scoring the film, but he had to turn it down due to scheduling conflicts with The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008).

103. The film had a torturous development process. Stuart Gordon was originally going to direct in 1990 when the rights were held by Universal Pictures, though nothing came of that. In 1996, Twentieth Century Fox acquired the rights with Nicolas Cage expressing an interest in the project. Two years later, it hadn't moved on so Tom Cruise tried to kickstart a production, to the extent of commissioning a script by Stan Lee and Jeff Vintar. Jeffrey Caine then did a polish on the screenplay. Still nothing. In 1999, Quentin Tarantino was approached to see if he could move things along but that too came to nothing. The rights moved to New Line Cinema in 2000 with Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, and Tim McCanlies writing a screenplay (this version even featured a cameo by Nick Fury). New Line Cinema started talking to Joss Whedon about directing, but this didn't pan out. By 2004, Nick Cassavetes was attached as director, but when this too failed, the rights reverted back to Marvel.

104. According to Phil Saunders, Tony Stark would develop a Mark IV armor, which would have been used in the final battle. This Mark IV armor would become the War Machine armor, and had swap-out armaments that would be worn over the Mark III armor. However, halfway through pre-production, the concept was removed from the script.

105. Property master Russell Bobbitt won Hamilton's "Behind the Camera Award 2008" for the props he created on this movie.

106. An early draft of the script (before Marvel Studios was making its own movies) would've kept Howard Stark alive, and had him adopt the War Machine identity as the film's antagonist.

107. Composer Ramin Djawadi's favorite musical score is the "Kickass" theme, because he composed it according to "a rhythm very much like a machine."

108. Louis Leterrier was interested in directing this film, but opted for The Incredible Hulk (2008) when Jon Favreau was given the job.

109. Robert Downey, Jr., Terrence Howard's father, Terrence Howard, Faran Tahir, Ramin Djawadi, and visual effects expert Stan Winston are fans of Iron Man.

110. The terrorist organization "Ten Rings" is a reference to Iron Man villain Mandarin, who wears ten rings imbued with superhuman abilities. Mandarin appeared in Iron Man 3 (2013), albeit in a radically different iteration from the comics.

111. Each Marvel superhero movie has a main theme: -This movie and sequels - Weaponry and technology. -The Incredible Hulk (2008) - Mutation and nuclear power. -Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) and sequels - Experimentation and espionage. -Thor (2011) and sequels - Mythology and religion. -Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) - Extra-terrestrial life and cosmic beings. -Ant-Man (2015) - Telepathy and control of animals. -Doctor Strange (2016) - Magic and witchcraft. -The Avengers (2012) - Alien Invasion. -Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) - Artificial Intelligence.

112. Len Wiseman was originally slated to direct.

113. According to The Cannon Group, Inc. co-owner, producer Yoram Globus, in the 1980s, along with Captain America, Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987), Spider-Man, and Masters of the Universe (1987), The Cannon Group, Inc. also had an Iron Man movie in production. The Cannon Group, Inc. wanted Tom Selleck to play Tony Stark. They also wanted the costume house that made the RoboCop (1987) suit to build the Iron Man costume.

114. This was the only movie for Terrence Howard to play Lieutenant Colonel James "Rhodey" Rhodes. However, Howard opted to not go forward with the character (reportedly for financial reasons) so Don Cheadle was brought in to assume the role commencing with Iron Man 2 (2010).

115. CAMEO: Stan Lee: (At around one hour and eight minutes) Comic writer Stan Lee appears at Tony Stark's party playing the role of Hugh Hefner, accompanied by three blonde women. Lee later mentioned that it was his most fun cameo.

116. Brian Michael Bendis had written three pages of dialogue for the Nick Fury scene, out of which the filmmakers chose the best lines. To keep it a secret, the scene was filmed with a skeleton crew, and was omitted from all previews of the film, which thus maintained the mystery and surprise, and kept fans speculative and interested. It conclusively appeared in the final cut as a post-credits scene.

117. When presented at the movie's end with the cover story by S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Coulson that Iron Man is employed by Tony Stark to act as his bodyguard, Stark dismisses it as "pretty flimsy". In the Iron Man comics, this was precisely the cover that Tony Stark used to protect his identity until 2002, when Stark went public with his identity as Iron Man.

118. According to Jeff Bridges, Obadiah Stane was originally supposed to survive the final battle against Tony, with Stark opening up Stane's destroyed suit to find that there was no corpse inside. Presumably this would have poised Stane to return for future movies.

119. The Iron Monger was the prototype of Tony Stark"s Mark 1 iron Man suit
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TOP 10 Melhores FILMES de NICOLAS CAGE - YouTube Nicolas Cage in brawl with Mötley Crüe lead singer Vince ... Leaving Las Vegas - ORIGINAL TRAILER HD (1995) NICOLAS ... Nicolas Cage Freakout Power Hour 2018 - YouTube Nicolas Cage - Epic scene from Zandalee - YouTube Nicholas Cage Freak-Out Montage - YouTube Greatest Nicolas Cage quotes and scenes of all time - YouTube Nicolas Cage is Jesus  The Rock (1996) The Rock - 1996 - Nicolas Cage Only (Fan Edit) - YouTube Nicolas Cage Farts

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